Posts Tagged ‘dogs’

Do the doggie bounce.

Soon, you’ll see a weekly video here. (I know you’re waiting with bated breath.)  Until then, enjoy a li’l somethin’ from The Flight of the Conchords:

An Open Letter to My Puppy

Flannery Dean’s “letter” in the new issue of BARK is hilariously good. If/when they have it up on the Web, I’ll share. But here’s a small snippet from “An Open Letter to My Puppy”:

golden lab puppy

Dearest Puppy, It's a good thing for both of us that you're cute.

“Alvy, I owe you an apology… That Google search–‘how to sedate + puppy‘—was just me goofing around. I would never have done it for real… I swear to god, I have no idea how Children’s Benadryl got into your water dish. I don’t even have children!”

“I’m sorry that sometimes I forget you’re a dog and not a baby. The BabyBjorn was absolutely too much, I agree (It’s in the closet with your bonnet and sleeper, if you were wondering. But just so you know: that sailor suit you tore to shreds wasn’t cheap.”

Wordless Wednesday

(Please help me with a caption!)

6 Reasons to Have a Dog.

Having a dog means…

1. It means you’ll always have someone who genuinely wants to have dinner with you.

2. It means there’s always someone at home waiting for you. (And, sometimes waiting on you. To throw that ball.)

3-ball-dog3. It means you’ll always be needed. And loved. And worthy of some tail-wagging.

4. It means there will always be someone who doesn’t judge you. Unless you forget a dog walk or meal time. At those rare instances, you might have to wait 2 seconds for forgiveness. Okay, done.

5. It means there’s someone who—despite #’s 1-4—is still their own being, capable of their own (sometimes irritating) decisions. And, physiologically speaking, could survive without you. Just doesn’t want to.

6. It means there’s always, always, always at least one happy living being in your home. Can you put a price on that?

Agree? Disagree? Add yours in the comments. And don’t miss tomorrow: 6 Reasons to have a cat.

5 Reasons Dogs Love Super Bowl Parties

wes a steeler and wilma a packer

Mmmm Cheeseheads.

5. Two words: super nachos.

4. Somebody always sits on a cat.

3. Quarterback seems to sniffing center’s butt.

2. By halftime, 20% of all food ends up on the floor.

1. Distracted owners = weak defense on the the trash can.

This is a blog hop! Check out all the other fun grrrridiron photos here:
All Things Dog Blog

Super Bowl special: 10 Dog MVPs

Okay, it’s Super Bowl week—honoring the best football teams and players. So in addition to posting 5 reasons dogs dig the Super Bowl, I’m honoring other four-leggers; my fellow canine compadres past and present who’ve shown why they belong on the dog team. Let’s call it canine heroes.

Belle the beagle

Isn't it obvious that this dog would prefer a good meal?

1. Smartest (besides me). Belle the beagle (of course) dialed “911” on a cell phone after her parent collapsed from a diabetic seizure. She became the first four-legger to win VITA’s Wireless Samaritan Award. Evidently, she’d been trained to bite down on the phone’s keypad in the event of an emergency. Treat, please.

2. Inspiring Bi-petisanship. Ginny endangered herself not once—but multiple times—to save feline friends. Once, she threw herself against a pipe so that it would topple and the stranded kitties inside could escape. Another time, Ginny suffered severe cuts on her paws to release an injured CAT inside a box of broken glass. And they say dogs and CATS don’t get along

Ginny the cat dog

Ginny doesn't discriminate.

3. Biggest heart. Nicole and her mom were attacked by 4 armed men and Bella, their 4 year-old Staffordshire Bull Terrier lunged at the man with the knife. She bit his leg several times. He shot her in the head, then turned his gun on Nicole, but had used his last bullet on Bella. And Bella kept defending until the men panicked and fled. (Kleenex, please.) Bella died in Nicole’s arms. An autopsy showed that Bella’s heart had been completely drained of blood in her fierce battle to protect her family.

4. Unbelievable doggie paddle. Katrina, the ironically named black lab, saved a drowning man before Hurricane Katrina’s rising flood waters claimed his life. The dog, who was later rescued herself by rescue teams, was honored at that year’s Genesis Awards with a standing ovation. (Note to future award granters: Recognition is nice, but we dogs like food. And lots of it.)

reona the rotty

Who's braver? Reona the rotty with Vivian the tiny totty.

5. Unwavering braveness.

Reona, a 109 pound Rottweiler, leapt over 3 fences during the 1989 San Francisco earthquake to come to the aid of 5-year old Vivian. Vivian’s epilepsy meant over excitement could bring on a life threatening seizure. Reona pushed her against the wall and held her still, and Vivian was soothed by his fur. Moments later, a large microwave fell in the exact spot that Vivian had just been.

6. Best schnoz. (And I’m a beagle, so this means a lot.) Shelby the German shepherd barked, scratched and whined until her human family was awake. Now, I do this, too—but apparently I’m only supposed to when carbon monoxide levels are too high. Shelby saved her whole family with her keen sense of smell and successful wakey-wakey routine.

Tip the dog

Tip your hat to Tip; she put the "loyal" in dog.

7. The MVP. Like Oprah, Weela had a sucky childhood, abandoned in an alley at 4-weeks old. And like Oprah, Weela was multi-talented. She first took the bite of a rattlesnake, rushing across the yard to push an 11-year old boy out of fangs’ way. Later, she went on to save 30 people and an eclectic group of furry friends after extreme flooding near her home. Holy mackerel.

8. Best Babysitter. If you’ve been around a baby, you know—oooooeeee, they make owie noises that hurt a dog’s ears. Kudos to this Kujo-looking brute who chose cuddling instead of mauling. Sorry I don’t know your name.

9. Undying loyalty. Tip and her master, Joseph Tagg, an eighty-one year-old man were on a walk when the old man, um, died. Search parties were set back due to severe frost and snow storms. In the spring, a sheepherder came across Joesph’s body, with a starving and sickly Tip beside him. She had waited for over three months, through the worst of winter, for help to come for the one she loved.

10. Biggest guitar hero. Eddie. Must see.


Should seniors have pets?

 

Someone's feeling the love here.

Each year, approximately 500,000 dogs and cats are placed in shelters when their parents die (According to the American Pet Products Association). Abandonment is the #1 reason dogs and cats wind up without homes. So that raises the question: should seniors be allowed to adopt pets that will likely outlive them?

Some shelters say no. The recidivism rate is too high, and the impact on the animals is too great.

Of course, the impact of pets on seniors is great, too. Studies show elderly people with pets are better able to remain emotionally stable during crises than those without, as well as stave off depression and loneliness. AND they’re physically healthier overall. AND pets can help lower people’s blood pressure and cholesterol, thereby reducing doctors’ visits (attention politicians!). Eden Alternative, an experimental elder care philosophy transforming traditional institutions to enlivened environments, has one senior location filled with over 100 birds, dogs, and cats and an outside pen with rabbits and chickens.  They believe that “companionship, the opportunity to give meaningful care to other living things, and the variety and spontaneity that mark an enlivened environment, can succeed where pills and therapies often fail.” And the results look good—over the past five years, they’ve experienced a mortality rate 15 percent lower than traditional nursing homes.

Where do you stand?


Alternatives

For seniors forced to give up their pets due to cost: Help-A-Pet provides financial aid to seniors who need assistance with veterinary costs. Pet Peace of Mind helps hospice patients hang on to their pets. There are pet food banks throughout the country. And the Humane Society has a fantastic list of other financial resources to assist with pet ownership.

For shelters resistant to allowing seniors to adopt: The Pets for the Elderly Foundation and Purina’s “Pets for Seniors” programs pay adoption fees to qualified shelters when they allow seniors to adopt pets.

Part-time pets: Pets on Wheels has volunteer organizations throughout the country, bringing pets to people and senior residences.

Pet trusts: A legal agreement arranging for the care of your pets in the event of your disability or death. Check out the ASPCA primer on pet trusts for more information. (Even better, win one of 5 Pet Trust certificates from Pet News and Views: Win A Pet Trust for Your Pets.)

References:
AAHA, Healthypet.com

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published a study in May of 1999
Between Pets and People: The Importance of Animal Companionship

National Institute of Health Technology Assessment Workshop: Health Benefits of Pets

%d bloggers like this: